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Photoshop, Illustrator or Indesign?

Date October 14, 2010 | Published by |

adobe creaite suite 5

Today I would like to cover a lot of misconceptions but most importantly the best practical approach on using “three” basic design software created by Adobe. This article/tutorial covers mostly the three practical softwares to use for art and design, which are, Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, and Indesign. As more and more features get added from version upgrades and update patches, it is important as a designer to understand which software is the best solution to reach the optimal results in your freelance projects or your personal projects.

photoshop

Adobe Photoshop

There are a lot of tutorials on Adobe Photoshop. As a matter of fact, there are so many tutorials that focuses on Photoshop that many people contact me or comment on this site stating that there are not enough tutorials on Illustrator or Indesign. (One factual tidbit: My Illustrator tutorial section is the most popular page in the tutorials section according to Google Analytics. To be even more honest, it is the most popular page in the whole domain.) It is a good thing that there are a lot of tutorials on Photoshop, but there are some negative side effects within widely vast available information. These tutorials help you become an expert on this software, and to my honesty, that is how I learned most majority of the techniques with Photoshop. The problem: The vast information network on Photoshop tutorials also causes people to become “too comfortable” with Photoshop and tend to “try” to do everything with Photoshop alone.

What is Photoshop?

The most important thing to know about Photoshop is that it is a pixel based program. Photoshop was primarily created in the beginning as a photograph enhancing tool and not so much anything else like it is used today. Adobe has recognized that many users were starting to use Photoshop to create elaborate UI designs, web page graphics, banner ADs, text effects and more. Adobe then started rolling out features that help designers create images for print, web, motion graphics and so on. However, again, the problem is that there are certain times when Photoshop is not needed (gasp!) to create certain projects.

Photoshop is generally used for:

  • Photo enhancement/Photo color correction
  • Software/Web/Mobile UI design
  • Web graphics
  • Motion graphics
  • Special effects
  • Common mistakes/misconceptions

    One common misconception is the idea that it is good to use Photoshop to create stationary systems and logo’s. For the sake of yourself, please take this idea outside the window. Let’s talk about business cards as an example. There is an alarming number of tutorials online that shows you how to create business cards in Photoshop. These are what I call “bad tutorials” that teaches you the wrong way of creating a business card. Despite the result and outcome of these tutorials being amazing, or perhaps you can even get it printed and it will look fine, it is a bad practice to get into an habit. Just because the result looks fine don’t mean the practice is the best way.

    First off Illustrator type is by far superior in print output than Photoshop is. Yes Photoshop can output type, and even in vector “paths”. Yes Photoshop can bring in vector objects as “smart objects”. Yes Photoshop can draw paths using the pen tool. But the most important thing out of all this is that IN THE END, it is outputted as pixel data. Yes I am aware that it also depends on the file output. For instance, .TIFF does not output vector data but does output layer information and transparency. But .EPS does support vector output, yet it still doesn’t mean this is the best practice to do so. So should you never use Photoshop to create business cards? There are times you actually want to use Photoshop to create business cards.

    When it is justified to use Photoshop for business cards and other print projects

    If your business cards contain any textures, photography, special effects, blurs (not that I am encouraging this), or any type of pixel based design, Photoshop is obviously the best way to go. However, remember to output ANY pixel based art work in 300 ppi resolution with CMYK color mode. Do not output it RGB. If you have Photoshop filters in your artwork, changing your work to CMYK mode, or even applying certain filters in CMYK mode seem to look desaturated or not look too good.

    The work around to this: Create all your special effects, filter effects, etc in RGB mode. Flatten the work (merge layers) after you feel that your work in Photoshop is complete, and change the color mode to CMYK. Again, you will regret not switching color modes to CMYK after you send it off to the printer. Your result will look significantly different than you hoped for.

    When you should never use Photoshop for print projects

    For the love of all things that you love, do not use Photoshop to set type in your print projects. It is important to note that I am not saying you should never use the type tool in Photoshop. I am stating that it is not a good idea to use it in print projects.

    Never use Photoshop to create logo’s. The obvious reason is because pixel data cannot be enlarged without distortion. If you create the logo in vector format, your logo will be scalable to any size forever.

    illustrator

    Adobe Illustrator

    What is Adobe Illustrator

    Well as the program states, Adobe Illustrator is a vector based drawing program. It is primarily used to create vector graphics that require to be scalable in print and for future uses. Adobe Illustrator is very similar to drawing programs like Adobe Fireworks (Macromedia Fireworks in the early 2000′s), and Corel Draw. It is superior in creating logo’s and logotype, and has an awesome type setting system within the program. Adobe Illustrator does one thing Photoshop can never meet up to its standard, and that is vector output. Whatever you create in Illustrator is scalable to the infinite power.

    Illustrator is generally used for:

  • Logo/Logotype/Monogram/Insignia design
  • Type setting for stationary systems/print campaigns
  • Web graphics
  • Motion graphics
  • Vector paintings/Illustrations
  • Common mistakes/misconceptions

    Although Illustrator can be used to create websites in the fullest degree, Photoshop is still ideally the best program in creating UI designs and other graphical elements for your website. Of course it will not be as harmful as creating business cards in Photoshop, but you will quickly find that the snapping feature in Photoshop is much precise in terms of pixels than Illustrator is.

    Illustrator cannot do animation. If you are looking to do flash animation, Illustrator will not do this for you. The best practice is to create graphics in Illustrator and bring them into Flash for the principle animation.

    Illustrator filters do not work the same way as Photoshop filters. You will be surprised in how many people think the filters work the same way as Photoshop. This is false.

    The prime time to use Illustrator

    As stated above, Illustrator is excellent for logo design, trademark design, logotype, type setting stationary systems, and creating greeting cards or wedding invitations.

    After the release of Illustrator CS4, it is now possible to create simple to complex brochures, annual reports, and even books in Illustrator CS4 and up. The only draw back to this is that it does not have master page utility in Illustrator like Indesign. It also does not support book templates and page numbers like Indesign. Although Illustrator CS4 and up has support for multiple artboards to create “pages”, it is simply there to create short page brochures, or when you want to output multiple PDF pages of your design variations to show your clients.

    Illustrator also has cross platform compatibility with Aftereffects. Importing .EPS files that contain text drawn in Illustrator is essentially better than importing .TIFF files that contain text drawn in Photoshop. Aftereffects support vector data to a certain degree during production (continuous rasterize).

    indesign

    Adobe Indesign

    There isn’t much confusion making when it comes to Adobe Indesign. Since Adobe Indesign itself is pretty specific in terms of what it can do and what it doesn’t do, while Photoshop and Indesign both share similar tools, interface, and abilities to create web graphics to in almost identical level.

    Indesign is generally used for:

  • Editorial design
  • Book design
  • Multiple page brochures
  • Annual reports
  • Interactive PDF documents
  • Common mistakes/misconceptions

    Although it is possible to “draw” objects in Indesign, it is not superior to drawing as it is with Illustrator. You should not draw elements in Indesign, but instead, use programs such as Illustrator or Photoshop to draw out the elements and import them into Indesign. Indesign also does not have filters like Photoshop. Creating a logo in Indesign is next to impossible.

    Although there isn’t much misconception with Indesign, there is much wide spread debate about Illustrator having better layout support than Indesign. Indesign however has better layout support, if not, identical to Illustrator.

    When to use Indesign

    If your project consist of a print project that has multiple pages or a master layout, Indesign has the master page function to do this. Indesign also has excellent support for 3 column layouts and so on. Creating type wrap in Indesign is much straightforward than Illustrator.

    Illustrator vs. Indesign

  • Illustrator does not have master pages.
  • Illustrator cannot define page numbers.
  • Indesign cannot draw objects as well as Illustrator.
  • Indesign does not have filters, as Illustrator does.
  • Indesign has superior type wrapping tools, while it maybe a bit confusing with Illustrator.
  • Illustrator vs. Photoshop

  • Illustrator has superior vector support, while Photoshop has limited.
  • Illustrator does better page layout than Photoshop.
  • Illustrator does not handle pixel art the same way as Photoshop does in terms of effects.
  • Photoshop is superior for photo enhancing.
  • Photoshop creates precise pixel based UI designs compared to Illustrator.
  • Illustrator supports multiple page output for PDF while Photoshop does not.
  • Photoshop layers is much straight forward than Illustrator. Organizing elements is much easier in Photoshop because of this.
  • Illustrator supports the “Place” (Importing graphics) command through dynamic file linking. Photoshop’s “Place” command is strictly embedded into the .PSD file and is not linked. This means that you can make changes to a certain file outside of Illustrator and you can reflect the changes in Illustrator using the Links panel. In Photoshop, whatever you place is permanent (credit to Kjell-Roger Ringstad for noticing this). Photoshop Creative Cloud 2014 now supports linked images using the “Place” command.
  • Illustrator exports .EPS file formats better than Photoshop.
  • Indesign vs. Photoshop

  • Indesign creates page layouts while Photoshop does not.
  • Indesign links elements or design objects from various locations in your hard drive. Photoshop does not. It is all placed in the document.
  • Indesign supports multiple pages for PDF and print. Photoshop is all one document.
  • Photoshop has filter effects while Indesign is limited.
  • Indesign supports XML, Photoshop does not.
  • Indesign supports vectors, imports .AI and .EPS with vector data encoded. In Photoshop this gets converted to paths or pseudo vector. The final output is still pixel based.
  • I hope this article was helpful to you. If you have some insight please let me know by commenting below. If you feel like I was wrong or I should add something to this article, please mention it in the comment section. Happy designing!

    138 Responses to “Photoshop, Illustrator or Indesign?”

    1. James@buy coffee maker said:
      October 25th, 2010 at 3:21 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Hi
      Which application is the best to design a logo with Photoshop,illustrator or fireworks?

    2. Melanie said:
      October 25th, 2010 at 3:39 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Thanks so much for this easy comparison. Many years ago I was taught Photoshop to use for a small component of my job for the company I was with at the time. Fast forward NOW and I have started my own wedding invitation business and am STILL using Photoshop for many of the reasons you stated above. I know I need to switch to Illustrator. I’ve played with it here and there but honestly it is SO different to Photoshop I don’t even know where to begin. But I think I’ll start now by going through your tutorials! Thanks again. Great information.

    3. Tweets that mention Adobe Photoshop vs. Illustrator vs. Indesign | Dream Infinity Studios / Chris Takakura | Art Direction + Design -- Topsy.com said:
      November 1st, 2010 at 12:15 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      [...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Mychal Sargent, Mychal Sargent. Mychal Sargent said: Great article for design junkies!http://www.dreaminfinity.com/nocturne/2010/10/photoshop-illustrator-or-indesign/#more-3058 [...]

    4. Joe said:
      November 5th, 2010 at 9:33 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Indesign has gotten so good in the vector department I actually prefer to use it a lot of times instead of Illustrator when I’m editing vector graphics. At some point they should just bundle all of IA features with Indesign and get rid of Illustrator all together.

    5. CNA Training said:
      November 10th, 2010 at 4:45 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Couldnt agree more with that, very attractive article

    6. Caley said:
      November 26th, 2010 at 12:21 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Hi, great article thank you.

    7. Lyndon said:
      December 22nd, 2010 at 4:14 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Very informative, good article

    8. Leor said:
      February 16th, 2011 at 11:15 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Great article..thanks for the information

    9. Photoshop, Illustrator & InDesign: That’s what it’s all about | ZAGGblog said:
      March 10th, 2011 at 4:26 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      [...] Great article validating my points and going much more in depth: DreamInfinity.com [...]

    10. Anonymous said:
      May 7th, 2011 at 8:08 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Loved this article, exactly what I was looking for.
      Thank you very much.

    11. Anonymous said:
      May 12th, 2011 at 4:56 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Thanks a bunch, this was soooooo helpful

    12. MB said:
      June 4th, 2011 at 6:08 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Perfect! A thorough and accessible answer with precisely the information I needed to answer my questions. Thanks much!

    13. Mindy said:
      August 13th, 2011 at 4:46 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Thanks for clearing that all up with so many comparisons and examples!

    14. Sindy said:
      October 12th, 2011 at 2:54 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      a very informative article, thx alot for the info.

      i am working of a children book, with lots of drawings, and less text, i used photoshop to color the pages and place the items, then at print it was all low quality, should i use ilustrator or indesign?

      thx for helping out.

    15. Chris said:
      October 12th, 2011 at 6:56 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      @Sindy:

      Hey Sindy,

      I sent you an e-mail regarding your issue. Let me know if you got it :)

    16. jill said:
      October 31st, 2011 at 9:10 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Thank you for the clarity of this article. I provide basic design for print and online, and I’ve been confused about when it is best to use each program; I’ve talked to friends and colleagues but I’ve found that they don’t actually know either. Usually they recommend their “favorite” program, assuring me that it’s the best.

    17. Illustrator vs. InDesign « gagaforgraphics said:
      November 6th, 2011 at 6:36 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      [...] Well, the programs are pretty similar, in appearance and functions.  I am fluent in both and go back-and-forth on which is my fav.   I’m a list-maker, the easiest way for me to make a hard life decision (and yes this is a hard life decision) is to write out a list of pro’s and con’s (and yes I actually do this).  So let’s make a list..and feel free to comment and add more if I missed one or you think I’m crazy and everything on my list is nonsense… which ehh sometimes happens..  also, here is a link to another blog that does a great job of explaining the benefits of each Dream Infinity Studios. [...]

    18. Sasi said:
      November 15th, 2011 at 12:59 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Very Informative. Good article. Thank You So Much!…

    19. Charles Amann said:
      November 17th, 2011 at 9:48 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Very understandable — well written.

      If your life depended upon, for general use, what would be the best of the three — particularly how it relates to website creation and development?

      Much thanks and keep up the good work….

    20. Chris said:
      November 20th, 2011 at 8:06 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      @Charles Amann: For web design, I generally stick with Photoshop since the pixel controls in Photoshop is far better than any other Adobe program.

    21. krigou said:
      November 24th, 2011 at 3:58 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      i might have a similar problem as sindy. i’m writing my MSc-thesis right now and i can handle ai and indd the way it serves my purposes.
      for this work i have to do a sh*tload of infographics. i’m quite unsure if i should do them all in illustrator and import them or use the tools in indd.
      how do you guys handle this?

    22. Adina said:
      December 9th, 2011 at 8:40 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Thanks,i found your article on the first page of Google and went no farther! i usually do small bi or tri fold brochure in illustrator but most of my peers believe inDesign would have been better? i say as long as its not a numbered project i really have no need for inDesign no matter how much i love it!!

    23. Anonymous said:
      December 14th, 2011 at 8:45 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      @Adina:
      Adina I agree! I like Illustrator better as long as I’m not doing nore than 3 pages!

    24. Alan said:
      December 17th, 2011 at 12:20 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      IMHO Indesign is where you bring your rasterized work (photoshop) and bring your vector work (Illustrator) bring everything together in one happy print friendly place.

      *to all you Graphic Designers laying out BC in Illustrator 4up on an 8.5X11 sheet.
      Talk to your printer (litho or digital) how they REALLY want your files…

      Bonus pet peeve: People that actually create a 12X18 sheet in InDesign and have 24(3X8 w bleed) instances of the same business card

    25. Daniel said:
      December 27th, 2011 at 9:22 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Wow. And here I thought that Photoshop was the only tool you need for anything design. I couldn’t have been more wrong. I’m currently looking into purchasing a program for designing my brochures. I’ve gotten by all this time without using any Adobe products. Fortunately, I’ve realized, I can’t dodge them anymore. Thank you for this post, as I now know I should be looking into Indesign for my current needs. I be sure to share this!

    26. Anonymous said:
      December 28th, 2011 at 8:37 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Two words! LIFE SAVER
      Thank you

    27. leev said:
      December 30th, 2011 at 8:12 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Very understandable explanation. I like the way you describe them short and to the point, thanks~! :)

    28. Chris Takakura said:
      January 3rd, 2012 at 6:44 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      @leev: Thank you for visiting! :)

    29. lori said:
      January 4th, 2012 at 9:40 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      hi – i need a software program to design pages to send as a pdf doc to create our own in-house one page ads text and photos we upload for custom magazines – i think indesign seems the way to go from this article? if i needed to choose just one – which would you suggest from illustator photoshop or indesign? im willing to learn any of the three and have enough experience with photoshop and dreamweaver that i feel comfortable with any –
      again – just single pages, color, custom text and photos of homes and profile images of realtors etc.

    30. Chris Takakura said:
      January 5th, 2012 at 8:32 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      @lori: I would use indesign for sure for the scope of the project that you are talking about. :)

    31. lori said:
      January 7th, 2012 at 7:17 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      @Chris Takakura: thank you!

    32. Genie said:
      January 9th, 2012 at 4:27 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Thank you for the comparison. I use Photoshop for most things but occasionally am asked to do business cards, brochures and the like. I do not like MS Word for so many things (except writing a letter) I used Photoshop instead but want to learn how to use Illustrator for business cards etc. I have Photoshop CS5. I don’t know whether to buy Illustrator now or if I can bundle it later with an upgrade. Also, I can not draw. Would I still find Illustrator useful to me?.

    33. Laila said:
      January 11th, 2012 at 10:24 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      It’s a good thing I passed by this article because I needed several things cleared for me. I understood what Photoshop and Illustrator are mainly for, however I was confused about what InDesign is used for. Opening the program, I realized it looked very similar to Illustrator and almost worked the same way.

      When I was a younger, I used Photoshop for practically everything, and even to make logos which was a big no-no. While I was making logos for my friend’s project, I realized, “well what happens if she wants the logo big?” So to be safe, I made the logo like 1000 x 1000 and hoped she won’t ask for a larger one.

      Years later, I installed Illustrator and I had NO clue how to work the program because it was so new to me. I was confused about how to use the pen tool so the program was practically deemed useless for me. It took me some time and I recently learned how to use the pen tool properly and it was the best day of my life. Now, I create almost everything on Illustrator and then bring it into Photoshop so I can use my graphics there.

      Having things on Illustrator was such a life saver and such an easy task. I can use everything in any size I want.

    34. Liz said:
      January 18th, 2012 at 8:52 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Hi, I am trying to create sublimation artwork for making mugs. So I need to create the artwork, put 4 to a page, print in mirror image, or flip it. The printer wont flip so the software needs to. Can you tell me which is better for this: Photoshop Elements 10 or Illustrator? Thank you.

    35. Kirsten said:
      January 28th, 2012 at 2:33 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Thank you. Thank you. Thank you for this post. Seriously, I am entirely new to the world of learning how to use the Adobe Suite. I joined Lynda to work my way through a bunch of tutorials. The problem right now is that I really need to work on a logo, and I just didn’t think that Photoshop was genuinely the program that I needed to be working with to create that. This post is very helpful. To Illustrator I go.

    36. Peter said:
      February 1st, 2012 at 7:44 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      oh my god. finally a simple and straightforward venn diagram-esque comparison. I’m just getting started with all this graphic design stuff and nobody could give me a straight answer when it came to comparing some of the CS programs. thank you so much

    37. Peter said:
      February 1st, 2012 at 7:44 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      oh my god. finally a simple and straightforward venn diagram-esque comparison. I’m just getting started with all this graphic design stuff and nobody could give me a straight answer when it came to comparing some of the CS programs. thank you so much

    38. Marinatrump said:
      February 5th, 2012 at 12:44 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Indeed a great article! Thank you!

      I am a super newbie to the Adobe world.
      I am currently working on making my business into life. Online business. Before I can outsource and pay someone to do a Graphic design Im doing everything myself. I have hundreds of Pencil Drawings (including a LOGO) I made and NOW its time to start editing them in Photoshop ( this is what I was told is my next logical step)

      I am confused on which program do I need to learn and work in?? Photoshop? or Illustrator? Or BOTH ?? Please please advice !! Thank you!

    39. Chris Takakura said:
      February 5th, 2012 at 2:51 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      @Marinatrump: I would do the logo in Illustrator but any pencil drawings that get converted to digital art, or digital paintings should be done in Photoshop. Of course if you want to create vector artwork from your pencil drawings, Illustrator is the best way to go. Good luck!

    40. Marinatrump said:
      February 8th, 2012 at 10:29 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      @Chris Takakura:
      Thank you so very much Chris!

      One last question pleeease!
      My friend (he is Photoshop amateur, well so am I) told me that all the drawings I made are useless and if I start using Photoshop i need to DRAW it IN Photoshop. This is so upsetting. I dont believe him..
      In your response you mentioned “pencil drawings that get converted to digital art”. Does it mean I convert them all into digital art and continue working on them using Photoshop? Editing, adding new details and effects. Is it possible?
      Than you so much!!!

    41. Chris Takakura said:
      February 8th, 2012 at 10:41 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      @Marinatrump: Never say never in Photoshop. Photoshop can do things I never thought possible and still blows me away till this point in my life here and there.

      Digital drawings, line drawings and such can be imported into Photoshop by scanning the artwork. Photoshop is the #1 tool for digital paintings, matte paintings and more. Once you scan in your line drawings, you can use the Photoshop’s level tool to thicken and darken up the line and start your drawings/coloring from that line drawing. All sorts of options are possible. I am not too familiar with Illustration techniques in Photoshop so I suggest you to google it for more resources.

      Your friend is unfortunately incorrect in all levels. You should never start a drawing or design on the computer first. I highly recommend sketching as the best pre-production method for any type of projects.

    42. Traci said:
      March 16th, 2012 at 9:29 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      This article was super helpful! If you have time for one more question . . .

      I’m fairly well versed in Photoshop (I have CS3). Up until now all of my design has been in this, but as my work expands more and more to print and logo design, I’m realizing I should break away from PS and start using Ai. I’ve done a great deal of design in PS (business cards, logos, etc.) that should have been done with illustrator in the first place and now, of course, run into issues with pixelation and such. My question is, will those designs have to be re-created using illustrator if I have any hope of using them in decent quality prints?

      Thank you again! – Traci

    43. Chris Takakura said:
      March 16th, 2012 at 11:04 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      @Traci: if you already did your design in photoshop, it might be possible to do an auto trace method in illustrator to ressurect your design to vector format. But please note that I stated as an if. Auto trace is really tricky and does not always do a good job. Please google illustrator auto trace tutorial to find out, more.

    44. Jack said:
      March 17th, 2012 at 10:32 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Hi, I have never used any of the above and was wondering, if I’m doing comics/manga, character design, general pictures and such, which is the best for me to use?

      When I put my pencil drawings in and start to colour etc, I want them to be of the highest quality when I print them, so again, which is best for me to use?

      Thank you in advance.

    45. JAN said:
      March 28th, 2012 at 7:24 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      I want to design my own book cover for both print and ebook copies. Should I use Photoshop or Illustrator, or can I use either?
      I’ve seen a video of a book cover made in Photoshop, (google: design a book cover in 5 minutes contest) and it looked great, but I need to purchase used software, and Illustrator seems to be a lot cheaper. Can I get by with it?
      Thanks!
      JAN

    46. Óscar CRuz said:
      April 18th, 2012 at 8:39 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Tanks for the explanation. Very good …

    47. Stephen Legaspi said:
      April 23rd, 2012 at 7:00 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Thank u so much. This article is really helpful . :D

    48. Vanessa said:
      May 21st, 2012 at 12:17 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      thanks, most enlightening

    49. Mitch said:
      May 29th, 2012 at 7:40 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Great article…. thanks for making it easy to understand im still shocked how so many people still create business cards in photoshop i never understood why. I had a lot of problems when doing it thru photoshop with poor quality issues.

      On a side note even thou the article did not include Fireworks as one of the comparison programs.. It is far surperior to photoshop for Web designers

      My 2cens

    50. Chris Takakura said:
      May 29th, 2012 at 7:43 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      @Mitch: Honestly with Fireworks vs. Photoshop, I am not too familiar with it cause I have grown up as a designer using Adobe products for web design instead of macromedia (at the time). I never got into Fireworks and have rarely been a requirement for employment, while Photoshop skill is a must have. I think with the programs, it is a matter of personal taste and what you are used to. I just been using Photoshop way too long to divert to something else when it comes to web design and UI design.

    51. anon said:
      May 30th, 2012 at 3:40 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      @James@buy coffee maker: @James@buy coffee maker: Did you bother to read the article? This question is specifically addressed very clearly.

    52. Anonymous said:
      June 10th, 2012 at 9:09 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      This is really a nice elaboration

    53. beginners guide to the apocalypse » illustrator vs indesign said:
      June 21st, 2012 at 1:49 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      [...] http://www.dreaminfinity.com/nocturne/2010/10/photoshop-illustrator-or-indesign/ [...]

    54. Gerard Willemse said:
      June 22nd, 2012 at 3:04 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      @Joe: I also find it much easier to use Indesign for logo design and any other vector based drawing. I also think Indesign and AI should just be bundled as a single package.

      Photoshop I agree should be strictly used for photo editing only.

    55. Lorna said:
      June 24th, 2012 at 1:07 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Thank you very much for this article, it was exactly what I was looking for, having been baffled by Adobe’s website! I now know what I need to know and am most grateful for the clarity of your comparisons.

    56. Chris Takakura said:
      June 25th, 2012 at 5:32 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      @Lorna: @Lorna: You welcome Lorna :)

    57. Anonymous said:
      July 21st, 2012 at 6:12 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Thank you Chris for your great article. I am designing a small box for a product with simple graphics and text. Which software would be best?

    58. Chris Takakura said:
      July 22nd, 2012 at 3:15 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      @Anonymous: I would use Illustrator to draw out the wireframe for the box and do the design on top of it. Regardless, Illustrator is the way to go.

    59. pilsengirl said:
      July 26th, 2012 at 10:00 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Thanks a ton! I have been confused for the longest time and now I have much more clarity. I can begin to use the software much more effectively and confidently. Big hug!

    60. omie said:
      July 27th, 2012 at 10:06 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      hi,which is the best to make magazines cover?thanks..

    61. Sandra said:
      August 8th, 2012 at 9:31 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Great article, thanks!

    62. Oppie said:
      August 16th, 2012 at 7:34 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Hi I’m making a comic book for print and I’m kind of a newb at this sort of thing though I’m familiar with photoshop. I do scan sketches and put them into photoshop, adding effects.. but should I, try to use Illustrator instead? Or can I place a photoshop document and change it into a vector image in illustrator or would that not work? :(

    63. Chris Takakura said:
      August 16th, 2012 at 10:25 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      @Oppie: I would stick with Photoshop when it comes to comic book for print. I would suggest you drawing the comic in a 300ppi document though if you are going to take it to print for optimal resolution. Unless you are doing vector illustrations, if you are “painting” the backgrounds and your comic book characters, Photoshop is the best tool for this. But use 300ppi!

    64. Chris Takakura said:
      August 16th, 2012 at 10:26 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      @omie: Use Photoshop for any image/photo editing and use Illustrator or Indesign for the typography.

    65. Eva said:
      September 2nd, 2012 at 2:09 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Thank you very much for this insightful article about these tools. I was getting mad trying to guess which one was best for website design and stationary design. Now it´s clear. Thanks again for taking the time to write about it.

    66. Samantha said:
      September 5th, 2012 at 7:39 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      How is something “bad” and “wrong” like a PS tut on business cards of the end outcome is amazing? I think people use what they have and make do with photoshop. Who can afford both?

    67. Adobe Crisis! | nessa*birdie said:
      September 17th, 2012 at 8:20 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      [...] Photoshop, Illustrator, or InDesign – Dream Infinity Studios [...]

    68. Siobhan said:
      October 2nd, 2012 at 10:46 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      @Chris:
      I am starting a greeting card business and was wondering what program I should use when making my cards. I am going to do cartoon style ones and also random nature scenes mixed in with some effects to make it more unique, also a few other types as well. My main question is which program is best for designing as well as printing? Funds are low and I cannot afford any mishaps with the print shop. Any and all comments will be appreciated. Thanks for your time.
      -Siobhan

    69. Chris Takakura said:
      October 2nd, 2012 at 10:48 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      @Siobhan: I would use Photoshop for any “effects” that you plan on doing and set the type and format in Illustrator with appropriate bleed settings. I cannot guarantee that printers will not mishap because each printer is different but that is the standard way to go.

    70. Chris Takakura said:
      October 2nd, 2012 at 10:49 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      @Samantha: Setting type on Photoshop is the worst thing you can do to yourself as a graphic designer. Getting comfortable in Photoshop to set type will result in a nightmarish scenario later on down the path of your career.

    71. gaj said:
      October 12th, 2012 at 10:43 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      This really help me to clear most of my views about these software

    72. Shellie said:
      November 12th, 2012 at 7:46 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      I’ve used Photoshop for logo creation because I am more familiar with the special effects tools in there than Illustrator. I did a 30 x 40 sign and it reproduced beautifully, so . . . Photoshop isn’t really all that bad. However, I’m having a new problem that is over my head. I’m using InDesign to create a flier with a black background and need to put this logo that was created in Photoshop into the InDesign piece. It comes over horribly pixelated. How do I get it in there properly? Is it the raster vs vector issue? Anything I can do?

    73. Chris Takakura said:
      November 12th, 2012 at 8:45 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      @Shellie: This is the reason why you don’t want to do logo’s in Photoshop. It’s coming out pixelated because you probably didn’t design the logo in a high enough resolution. If you are going to print out a pixel document, you need to work with over 250ppi in order for things to come out crisp. Doing logo’s in Illustrator prevents this problem because you can resize vector files to any size you want.

    74. Shellie said:
      November 12th, 2012 at 10:45 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      I did it 300 ppi and very large dimension-wise, then placed and reduced it in InDesign. I made a PDF of the finished InDesign document and the logo actually doesn’t look bad, but I’m really picky and want to do it right in the future. Are you saying that there isn’t a “trick” to bringing an item created in Photoshop into InDesign? (It’s the type of project I could have done in Photoshop but I’m trying to do what you’re suggesting and use the appropriate program for each project.) I gave up on Illustrator because I couldn’t see where I can do highlights, shadows, embossing effects, etc. Are those effects there…just not obvious to me?

      Also, the background of the InDesign document is black. The Photoshop logo is transparent, but when placed into InDesign, it has a faint grey background behind the logo that is visible against the InDesign black background. Any ideas? Thanks so much for your time and expertise.

    75. Chris Takakura said:
      November 13th, 2012 at 12:59 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      @Shellie: You can always import Photoshop .PSD documents into Photoshop or my preference is to save a high resolution imagery as a .TIFF file and import it that way.

      I am not really familiar in regards to emboss and what not being unclear. It is really a good practice not to use “effects” on logo’s. The most thing I resort to is gradients but in regards to emboss and things, I would not utilize Photoshop filters as a part of the logo.

      There are ways to import Photoshop documents into Indesign, as stated, via .PSD or .TIFF. I know you can do logo’s using Photoshop, even Indesign, but all in all what I mention on this blog post is how it is just a industrial standard practice to do logo’s in vector format.

      You can also bring in Illustrator designed logo’s into Photoshop via copy and paste. Then choose Smart Objects and you can apply special effects there.

      Hope I helped.

    76. Frankie said:
      December 5th, 2012 at 12:20 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      I got a question,

      I tend to make flyers using Photoshop because a lot of my source files are already pixel based images. These are basically photos submitted by clients, textures found online… etc. I don’t see the need to use vectors because, well, a pixel photo in Illustrator is still a pixel photo.

      Another thing about flyers is their dimensions are set in stone so they do not benefit from scalability, meaning text and graphics created on Photoshop are of similar or superior in quality compared to the complementing photos.

      I do stick to some rules, always min 300ppi CMYK 16bit, never enlarge photos or rasterized graphics and never rasterize unless it’s absolutely necessary.

      Is my thinking sound or is there something I overlooked or didn’t know that could be hurting my product?

    77. Chris Takakura said:
      December 5th, 2012 at 2:50 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      It is a matter of practice. Sure you can draw a circle in MS Paint and then save it as a JPG to import into Photoshop but would you do that?

      I know that Photoshop output is strong when it comes to print, but you really do not want to “set type” in Photoshop. Go to any design studio and they will tell you the same thing. (Legit design studios anyway).

    78. Frankie said:
      December 5th, 2012 at 5:26 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      @Chris Takakura: Thnx for the quick reply.

      You didn’t answer my question. Bad practice or not, is it wrong to create flyers on Photoshop? Is it hurting my product?

      Don’t get me wrong, I always use Illustrator to create logos and complex graphics – I just find it a waste of time creating what is essentially a montage of pixel based images and textures in a vector environmental that will still require me to use some Photoshop.

    79. Chris Takakura said:
      December 5th, 2012 at 5:33 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      @Frankie: It is not “wrong” to do anything in any Adobe products. If you can create a 300ppi brochure all in Photoshop and if it turns out well to you or your client then I say keep doing what you do. My whole concept of using Illustrator for typography is not a system I created, it is a system the industry follows. Just as how anyone wanting to be a graphic designer must be familiar or be a master at Adobe products more so than the Coral suite. We don’t really have a choice.

      If you are creating a montage of pixel based images as a brochure without any texts of any kind than just use Photoshop. If there is texts involved, logo that needs to be placed, etc… I say use Illustrator or Indesign. In order to embrace what the industry recommends you to do, you need to understand WHY Illustrator and Indesign is there in the 1st place, and what the difference of those two even are.

      I understand what you are trying to do, for instance, when I create my wallpaper designs and get them printed, do I use Illustrator? This all depends on if there is any typography, if there is any effects on it, etc… For most instances since I do have effects on it with my abstracts, I just stick with Photoshop and export it as high as 500ppi.

      But in all honesty, I do not believe there is a “wrong” way of doing anything in design, it’s just a matter of which has the stronger output and a secure output to make sure the end product is as high in quality as you are getting paid to do.

      Hope that answers your question.

    80. reese said:
      December 9th, 2012 at 4:01 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      I’m thinking this question is similar to the last one you answered, but I wanted to make sure (if the answer is similar, then no need to answer).

      I would like to create a greeting card using a photo (like the ones offered on Shutterfly.com or TinyPrints.com) and print. I would like to add some graphics and text on top of the photo. Or what if I’d like to create a border or background for the photo(s)?

      I am guessing it is best to use Illustrator for this (Photoshop to edit the photo first and then Place in Illustrator). Can you please confirm?

      Thanks for your time!! I appreciate it!

    81. Chris Takakura said:
      December 9th, 2012 at 4:51 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      @reese: Yes your method would work just fine. :)

    82. colleen said:
      January 1st, 2013 at 10:38 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Great post and support! You have inspired me to take my Photoshop skills and start laying them out in InDesign. Illustrator still scares me, but I will eventually conquer it.
      Thanks:)

    83. Laedersofa.Dk said:
      January 4th, 2013 at 11:00 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      It’s a pity you don’t have a donate button! I’d most certainly donate to this outstanding blog! I suppose for now i’ll
      settle for bookmarking and adding your RSS feed to my Google account.
      I look forward to brand new updates and will share this blog with
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    84. http://tinyurl.com/womelung08234 said:
      January 11th, 2013 at 8:28 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Thanks for the post for writing “Adobe Photoshop vs.

      Illustrator vs. Indesign | Dream Infinity Studios / Chris Takakura
      | Art Direction + Design”. I actuallywill certainly be returning for a
      lot more reading through and commenting here soon. Many thanks,
      Delbert

    85. Anonymous said:
      January 15th, 2013 at 8:15 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Can you edit a PDF document created by someone else in InDesign or Illustrator. Taking a new job and some things were sent to us and created a while ago and need a few things updated.

    86. Mike said:
      January 31st, 2013 at 12:23 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Very helpful article! Especially for novices (like myself). Thanks!

    87. Anonymous said:
      February 8th, 2013 at 11:37 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Freaking awesome post. This was extremely helpful in design dabbling.

    88. Jason Melo Hall said:
      February 8th, 2013 at 11:38 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Freaking awesome post. This was extremely helpful in design dabbling.

    89. Rich said:
      February 9th, 2013 at 5:06 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Time to move to illustrator . As a restaurateur I have been designing menus in publisher and has worked well for what it does but the last 2 years I have learnt graphic and webdesign through an arkward process of using drawplus for graphics, publisher for text, acd for images and photoshop 2 if sent to someone who needs to edit my work. I now understand why after trying photoshop for menu design I reverted back to publisher. I assume illustrator is good with printing formats eg alligning up 2 double sided A5 docs for an a4 print that get cut down the middle.
      Thank you for making me see the light and become a quicker designer… maybe even a better one

    90. Chris Takakura said:
      February 9th, 2013 at 5:09 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      You welcome :-)

    91. skm said:
      February 18th, 2013 at 8:26 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Thank you for this article. Concise and to the point, but you already know that.

    92. Paula said:
      February 27th, 2013 at 6:57 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Hello and thank you so much for the clarification above. I am absolutely new to this and really appreciate the information. I am interested in starting to do art with a Wacom tablet I bought. My idea is that I would like to draw and paint just as I would on paper or canvas. Therefore, I am in doubt as to which program to purchase for my drawings: Illustrator or Corel Draw? Also, when a drawing or painting is made, must it be vectorized? Couldn’t these be printed or published just as they are?
      Thank you very much for your help,
      Paula

    93. Deconstructed | Blog » Photoshop Etiquette said:
      February 28th, 2013 at 10:21 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      [...] I should not miss this one ‘Photoshop, Illustrator or Indesign?’, my favourite. It is simply explained and if followed and read by young designers these days, we [...]

    94. Raysenn said:
      March 6th, 2013 at 2:05 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Apples, oranges.

      The dangerous thing is when people just use ONE of those programs for all three purposes, as I see in many, many, forums. I ain’t editing a photo in Illustrator, and I ain’t creatin’ no logo in Photoshop, and I ain’t layin’ out no book in anythin’ but InDesign.

      Unfortunately, not everyone agrees with that. The Fireworks guru forum is an example of this.

    95. gree said:
      March 15th, 2013 at 9:17 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Brilliant! thanks to this info…everything is clear now! i started doing my architecture portfolio on photoshop and yes i realised it was a mistake which led me here! im also a corel user but wasn’t happy with my work because of which i switched to ps!Anyway thinking of looking at indesign now..it should help right?

      Thanks!

    96. Yalda said:
      March 26th, 2013 at 2:38 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Information that I will keep as a treasure in my life!! Thank you

    97. Anonymous said:
      March 27th, 2013 at 12:57 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Hi,
      Thanks a lot for your guidelines. They were helpful to me.

    98. Best Creatine said:
      April 30th, 2013 at 7:10 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Hey there, You must have done an admirable job. I am going to unquestionably yahoo it plus in my personal opinion highly recommend to be able to my local freinds. I believe they shall be benefited from this excellent website.

    99. Anonymous said:
      May 4th, 2013 at 4:35 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      As someone who is new to ALL of this, but who wants to produce designs for textile work and who has been an Art teacher for 33 years and now retired. I want to embrace the technology but don’t know where to start!! Please advise.

    100. Erica said:
      May 13th, 2013 at 3:59 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      How does Illustrator compare to Canvas by ACD?

    101. creating websites said:
      May 22nd, 2013 at 7:54 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      it seems like ages that i heve been searching for a website like this one? i am glad i found it,some great information here, i am new and just starting out, anyway thanks for some great tips..

    102. Marnie Jane said:
      May 30th, 2013 at 10:03 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      I need all three. 1 to touch up images, 2 to make logos or draw, and 3 to put it all together in multiple pages. Thanks!

    103. Anonymous said:
      June 12th, 2013 at 5:49 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      For an absolutely newbie – this article was very, very helpful, thank you so much

    104. JJ Usher said:
      June 14th, 2013 at 5:48 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Quality content is the main to invite the visitors to pay a visit the website, that’s what this web page is providing.

    105. WNYWILLIEB said:
      June 15th, 2013 at 4:49 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Why is it none of these articles _ever_ touch on large format printing, which requires even more of a fussy approach??

      I cannot tell you the number of times I have received InDesign PDFs of banners, signs, etc. which simply do not output.

      Then, try and drag that InDesign PDF into Illustrator to “clean it up,” good luck! Is there ANY compatibility with transparencies and gradients? Ever??

      PDFs aren’t quite the tasty treat they used to be …. there is no compatibility between PDFs anymore ….

    106. Anonymous said:
      July 15th, 2013 at 3:45 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Just the article I’ve been desperate to read! Thank you. I have struggled with pixelated text in my artwork (using photography with text) and I think I should find a way forward now. Maybe a mix of two programs … thanks again ; – )

    107. Anonymous said:
      July 18th, 2013 at 9:22 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Haha, great right on spot article!

      Exactly as I was taught in a rather expensive PR grad school class on graphics design. I was looking for a quick refresher and came across your site here. Thanks!

    108. Discoveryellow said:
      July 18th, 2013 at 9:22 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Haha, great right on spot article!

      Exactly as I was taught in a rather expensive PR grad school class on graphics design. I was looking for a quick refresher and came across your site here. Thanks!

    109. sampath said:
      August 12th, 2013 at 1:24 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      can you tell which one is best developing side scrolling game designs

    110. Chris Takakura said:
      August 13th, 2013 at 5:09 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Most likely Photoshop, although I am really not experienced in game designs.

    111. Anonymous said:
      October 7th, 2013 at 9:16 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      thanks a lot for the information which was very useful. Wish you good luck…!!!

    112. Tanya said:
      November 8th, 2013 at 7:48 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      I have to switch from Publisher. Is InDesign the right way to go for designing 4 page newsletters? I do not create my own images. I just use clip art.

    113. Anonymous said:
      November 12th, 2013 at 2:48 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Hi there, i design custom wedding invitations and the samples that I have printed using photo shop designs come out kind of pixelated and are not as clear as i would like.

      Which one of the three would be best to get a clear image and less of the “pixel” look? And do you know cost for each program?

      Thanks so much

    114. Ria said:
      November 14th, 2013 at 3:57 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Indeed a great article! Helped a lot to understand the difference and uses of the three software.

      Thanx!

    115. What’s the Best Software for Business Card Design? | PrintFirm Blog said:
      November 22nd, 2013 at 12:08 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      […] I hope you find this information useful. For a much more indepth look into this topic, please review this detailed explanation here: Photoshop, Illustrator, or InDesign. […]

    116. Anonymous said:
      November 22nd, 2013 at 9:34 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      @Raysenn:
      Could’ve have said it better myself. I have seen people try and do a layout in Illustrator with photos, type and vector images. One guy I knew darn near burst an artery after doing a one page pamphlet in illustrator. I can see a business card or a poster with little type and not many images done in illustrator. Being a seasoned layout person in retail and corporate print materials, using indesign is the way to go especially when the client ask for massive changes on the layout of a newspaper, brochure, 4 page booklet right up to a flyer and catalogue.

    117. Chris Takakura said:
      November 30th, 2013 at 6:34 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      @Anonymous: I agree with you too.

    118. Angela said:
      December 2nd, 2013 at 10:46 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      I am trying to figure out how to attach a few holiday GIFs I created in photoshop to work online (facebook says no way) BUT I would like to add them to our e-mail blasts which I usually do on illustrator and saved as a jpeg. What programs should I be using to design the email so the gif works? How do I get the GIFs to work on tumblr, pintrest and the company’s website? I have tried putting them on an online gif maker page but it just wants to make a link to the gif maker site.

    119. most popular blogs said:
      December 12th, 2013 at 11:22 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Hi, I jumped over to your webpage via Facebook. Not some thing I customarily read, however I enjoy your perspectives none the less. A big heads up for putting together something worthy of reading!

    120. roha said:
      January 1st, 2014 at 11:48 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Great way of comparison. It gave me a grasp of what all differences they have.

    121. r.okoye said:
      January 14th, 2014 at 12:24 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      This article was very helpful. Thank you

    122. Alexandra said:
      January 20th, 2014 at 6:30 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      thank you for your article, it helps a lot a rookie like me. I have a question, though: is it possible to import .eps files in PS without affecting the scaling? I need to add some textures to an illustration and I’m not sure whether I must use AI or PS..thank you very much.

    123. Chris Takakura said:
      January 20th, 2014 at 11:51 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      @Alexandra: Alexandra, if you can create the texture with Illustrator, I highly advise you to do so with that program. Of course, creating textures in Illustrator is a bit of a challenge compared to using Photoshop.

      It is definitely possible to import .eps files in PS without affecting the scaling as you can use the paste and paste as smart object feature to keep that eps object from distorting if you enlarge or scale down an object. Hope that answers your question.

    124. The Right Program for the right Job | Home Cooked Website Solutions Inc. said:
      January 21st, 2014 at 2:26 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      […] When it comes down to it though, every program is built for a reason and no one program can do it all.  A designer that offers a variety of services should be proficient with numerous programs. This article explains well which Adobe products are best suited for certain jobs. If you tend to always use one design program, it’s probably worth a read. It may open your eyes to why it’s worth keeping up with even your most hated design programs. Read Photoshop, Illustrator or InDesign. […]

    125. Anonymous said:
      January 26th, 2014 at 6:28 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      @James@buy coffee maker: did you even read the article?

    126. Get the Hook!!! said:
      February 22nd, 2014 at 3:09 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      […] http://www.dreaminfinity.com/nocturne/2010/10/photoshop-illustrator-or-indesign/ […]

    127. Photoshop, Illustrator, or InDesign | Introduction to Visual Communications said:
      April 1st, 2014 at 11:24 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      […] http://www.dreaminfinity.com/nocturne/2010/10/photoshop-illustrator-or-indesign/ […]

    128. Photoshop, Illustrator And InDesign: What’s The Difference? | Candeo Creative : Blog said:
      May 2nd, 2014 at 12:46 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      […] print projects. Still not sure if you are using the right program for the right project? Visit the full Chris Takaura article to go a little more in-depth, or feel free to contact us and allow us to do the work for […]

    129. Adobe InDesign | McCloughan said:
      May 3rd, 2014 at 11:52 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      […] what is the specialty of each.  I found a good article that answered some of these questions for me here.  Other products such as Photoshop and Illustrator have a pretty broad scope of capabilities, but […]

    130. ShylahPetkus said:
      May 8th, 2014 at 10:45 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Hi, Thank you for this article!
      I use Illustrator to create graphics and then place them into my Indesign documents and find it annoyed to print from Illustrator docs. There is no “page layout” tool and you can’t set margins (unless show rulers and pull out guides every single time!). It is so annoying. I don’t know how anyone does repeating page layout in illustrator.

      Oh, but the real reason I’m writing a comment is because I think you mean “stationery” not “stationary.”

    131. Anas Raza said:
      June 12th, 2014 at 3:47 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      thanks for posting this lovely article

    132. Mukesh said:
      July 6th, 2014 at 11:37 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Hi there. Hope someone could help me. I designed a banner in Indesign. The banner had an image which I edited with Photoshop (removing the background) and saved it as a PSD and imported it to Indesign. The background of the banner was black. I then exported the document as a PDF to print it. When I printed the banner, there was a light maroon block around my image. Does anyone know why? Thank you! Mukesh

    133. Chris Takakura said:
      July 7th, 2014 at 1:42 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      @Mukesh: What image type did you save it as?

    134. Mukesh said:
      July 7th, 2014 at 2:07 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Thank you for your reply. I saved the image as a PSD (Photoshop document)

    135. Chris Takakura said:
      July 7th, 2014 at 2:09 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      @Mukesh: Try saving that image as a TIFF in high resolution and see if that works. A bit hard to troubleshoot printer issues cause I am not there.

    136. Codrut said:
      July 8th, 2014 at 12:29 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      @James@buy coffee maker: He made it very clear that Photoshop is not for logo design. Illustrator is the right tool

    137. Anonymous said:
      July 16th, 2014 at 7:01 pm | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      Hi just wondering if i wanted to create infograhics would in design be the best for that?

    138. PhotoShop | taylorsdigijoanwcl said:
      August 25th, 2014 at 12:03 am | reply to this postReply to this comment |

      […] Reference: (http://www.dreaminfinity.com/nocturne/2010/10/photoshop-illustrator-or-indesign/) […]

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